Sunday, 27 September 2020

A Century of Irish Radio including Pirate Radio in Words and Pictures.

A century of Irish radio has delivered wonderful entertainment, social change and political upheaval. 


In 1926 the first official radio station in Ireland took to the airwaves on January 1st 1926 with the arrival of 2RN, later to become Radio Eireann and today as RTE Radio


The State broadcaster enjoyed a monopoly for more than fifty years bar a couple of illegal stations mostly of a political nature, but with the arrival of the transistor radio, pop music and offshore pirate radio stations like Radio Caroline, Irish pirate radio stations began to take to the airwaves.



To counter the arrival of pirate stations, the State broadcaster RTE began to tour the country with a mobile radio station that visited towns, villages and communities usually for the duration of a local festival. Rather than demonstrate the RTE could provide regional and local broadcasting, these local mobile operations led in many instances to the opening of a pirate radio station in the wake of RTE's departure.
 

Pirate stations appeared in every corner of Ireland, providing local information, local advertising, advertising, local news and a local voice. 







To celebrate the contribution of Irish pirate radio to the political and social history of Ireland, I have lectured at home and abroad on various aspects of Irish radio history. 


Pirate radio stations not alone proliferated in the Republic of Ireland but also in Northern Ireland especially sectarian pirate radio during the early years of the troubles from 1969-1975



      
  

In December 1988, a golden era of pirate radio in Ireland came to an end with the introduction of stricter broadcasting laws and the replacement of the pirates with legal, commercial and independent radio.



For more information on the history of Irish radio, my book 'A Century of Irish Radio 1900 - 2000' is available in hardback and on kindle. Copies are available here
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Century-Irish-Radio-1900-2000/dp/1717899641

For a signed copy of the book including post and packages (in Ireland & UK) are available by contacting theirishpirateradioarchive@gmail.com with payment through the secure paypal service. 




 

Wednesday, 26 August 2020

Irish Radio During Covid19

 John Purcell, Chairman of the Independent Broadcasters of Ireland (IBI) said,

‘Ireland is a nation built on the airwaves and in times of crisis it is to radio that people turn to get the most up to date and reliable information, for entertainment as a reprieve from the stress of our current daily lives and to hear local stories from local voices’.

 Since its invention over a century ago, the medium of radio has dominated how the consumer has been both entertained and informed. The pandemic that has enveloped the world in 2020 has had a drastic and profound effect on radio both in Ireland and worldwide. So, on the off chance that you have spent most of your lockdown time watching TV, scrolling through your social media news feeds or binge watching box sets, this is a look at radio in Ireland during lockdown. Radio is an intimate and immediate media that requires plenty of fresh and live content. Unlike TV, radio broadcasters are less able to fall back on archive material to keep the airwaves filled. 

The negative effects on Irish radio are confirmed when put into context of the global radio situation. In April, the major US radio network NPR cut pay and benefits in a bid to “save jobs and support the future of NPR” after the coronavirus pandemic ballooned its projected losses to as much as $53 million over the next two years. Employees’ pay was reduced on a sliding scale of up to 9% through Sept. 30th and workers were also offered furloughs said NPR Chief Executive Officer John Lansing. 

 

One of the earliest consequences of both the lockdown the came into effect just after St. Patrick's Day, was the need to socially distance was that presenters and DJ’s began to work from home. Linking to the studios via the internet. Presenters including RTE’s Claire Byrne, who contracted the virus, were broadcasting from sheds, attics, hot presses and bedrooms. It was a through back to the heyday of the Irish pirate radio stations where these were often the location of the illegal studios. It affected all stations, national, commercial and even community stations like Flirt FM where the staff had to quickly adapt to working remotely. Ciara Kelly on Newstalk, a trained doctor was another broadcaster to both broadcast from home and to contract the virus, sharing her experience with her listeners. 

(c) @ciarakellydoc

 The consumption of radio was also to suffer the effects of Covid 19 as up to the virus’s arrival in Ireland, most listeners got their radio through their cars as they commuted to and from work or on school runs. As a result of the stringent Government announced lockdown in March, the car was parked up for many months. While many turned to exercise to relieve the boredom and to stay fit replacing the gym, their earphones were more likely tuned to their own musical playlists from apps like Spotify rather than a radio station. It was also to the detriment of radio stations that newer phones do not allow the use of the FM radio on their devices and so stations relied on listeners downloading individual apps or apps like ‘Ireland Radio Online’ or ‘Tune-In’.

 

Irish radio, just as it is globally, has suffered as the Advertising spend has contracted and put financial strain on radio stations. Radio has lost out as the result of major changes in what the listener consumes and spends their money on as they cocooned for weeks. As we spent more time in our homes, only leaving for exercise or shopping for essentials at the supermarket or the pharmacy, we spent more time online, both to entertain and to spend. The advertising Euro migrated from the radio and traditional media to online spend. According to the Irish Times Google and Facebook in 2019 ‘collected an estimated 40% of the total advertising spend in Ireland’ adding ‘The Irish advertising market, which for so long was the source of income for independent radio, has been lost to these two unregulated global giants’.

 

The financial viability of this new radio landscape for stations came under the microscope. As early as March, Communicorp, headed by entrepreneur Denis O’Brien and operating a range of stations including Newstalk and Spin announced that all staff would be suffer enforced pay cuts of up to 25%. The rationale was that a pay cut would eliminate the need for redundancies. The media giant attempted to paint a better picture of how their product was being received by its listeners. According to ADworld.ie,

‘New research carried out by Media Central for Communicorp Media shows that Irish people are listening to more radio during the Covid-19 outbreak and that engagement levels with radio have increased significantly. The research received over 6,000 responses over a 48hr period on the March 24th and 25th and focused on Communicorp’s stations including Today FM, Newstalk. Dublin’s 98FM, Spin1038 and Spin South West. According to the research, Communicorp Media stations have seen a significant growth in listenership with reach growing by 34% while people are listening for 45% longer. In addition, the research shows that app downloads for Communicorp apps have increased by 47% while there has been a 54% increase in the number of listeners accessing their stations via a smart speaker.’

The contraction of the market and despite enforcing pay cuts on their staff, according to the Times newspaper in August 2020,

‘Denis O’Brien’s Radio Two Thousand has increased its shareholding in Newstalk after buying shares from the Loyola pub and restaurant group. In February of this year, Radio Two Thousand Limited, a subsidiary of O’Brien’s Communicorp, bought an 18.89% stake in News 106, which operates the Newstalk station. The transaction was revealed in the minutes of a Broadcasting Authority of Ireland meeting, obtained by The Sunday Times. The shares were previously owned by Hyper Trust, the company behind the Leopardstown Inn in Stillorgan, Dublin. The pub was acquired from examinership in 2015 by the Loyola pub group, which is owned by businessmen Stephen Cooney, Brian O’Malley and Eoin O’Malley, a former Leinster rugby player.’

 

Community radio stations provided updates and news for many rural communities and they provided religious services for a congregation who saw their churches closed. The Lions Club created their own new show, which was broadcast on Ros FM, a community station in Roscommon. Local Lions Club member Kathleen Shanagher said,

"We created our own new daily show 'The Rossie Way' on the community station RosFM and every day we feature everything except the news of the virus. We have comedy, sport, religion, gardening, cookery, local history and a daily quiz too - just no Covid-19. We even gave out 100 new radios (donated by Tesco), presenting them to people who did not have their own portable set and now 5,000 listeners listen every day."


 There were many pop-up ‘radio’ stations using various platforms to ‘broadcast’ including on Facebook live. One of those stations was the aptly named ‘Covid Radio Swinford’. Located in the then closed White House pub on Chapel Street, the station run by the pub owners son had a huge following both at home and abroad, connecting Mayo people across the world with music and requests, although the broadcasts occasionally fell foul of copyright rules. With over one hundred broadcasts, Covid Radio Swinford made its final broadcast from the front window of the pub on June 28th just before the pub was due to reopen. Quarantine FM began on Monday March 22nd and was launched by Anna-Rose Charleston and Kate McKeown and proved popular. In Galway Benen Tierney launched Lockdown Live Radio online from him home, with presenters working remotely to entertain. As restrictions were lifted the station was renamed ‘Freedom Gold’.




In Northern Ireland, the Protestant/Loyalist traditions celebrate July 12th as the anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne and is usually marked by bonfires, fireworks and parades throughout Northern Ireland but with Covid restrictions the Orange Order needed a different way of reaching their community. Radio Boyne described as a ‘pop up station’ was launched July 10th at 11am by Deputy Grand Master Harold Henning followed at 2.30 pm by the 'Twelfth Request Show.' The station remained on air for four days broadcasting including on The Twelfth of July, on various digital platforms and their own app. It proved popular and successful especially with listeners in Belfast.




Other stations opened in a blaze of publicity and quickly disappeared like Gold Radio which launched in early May in the midst of the pandemic. Gold Radio’s line-up included founder Mike Moloney (RTÉ 2FM, RTÉ Gold & Radio Nova), Chris Barry (FM104 & 98FM), Electric Eddie (RTÉ 2FM & Q102), Liam Quigley (98FM, Q102, RTÉ 2FM & Radio Nova), Mick Mulcahy (Cork’s 96FM & Red FM), Pat James (Radio Nova), Bob Conway (RTÉ 2FM, KFM & East Coast FM) and Dave Lyons (98FM, Classic Hits 4FM & DJ at Copper Face Jacks). Station Manager, Mike Moloney, explains why now is a good time to launch a radio station,

“When RTÉ announced that it was going to shut its entire digital service, including RTÉ Gold, I couldn’t believe it! Turns out I wasn’t the only one and out of that came the idea for Gold Radio. As the technology was easily available to everyone, we decided it was timely to launch Ireland’s first fully manned, digital-only, radio station. It’s going to be a fun station, playing music everyone knows, staffed by DJs who the listeners will remember, and all of them got involved to play the music they love and have a good time. That attitude led to the station’s motto: ‘Gold Radio, Playing the Good Stuff’. The original idea was that all staff would be paid from the beginning, but Covid-19 put an end to that. The plan stalled for a while and then it was decided to go ahead anyway, with minimum funding, and at least get Gold Radio broadcasting. There was so much goodwill for the project that we found a load of presenters who were quite willing, at least for the moment, to go on air and work for nothing.
Unlike most other stations these days, where presenters have to toe a company line and dare not adjust the computer playlist in front of them, our crew can happily change any track they don’t like that may appear on their playlist and say what they like, once it doesn’t get us sued! It’s that old-fashioned thing that we all grew up on – Personality Radio.

 

With the lockdown forcing Catholic Churches to close their doors and services including funerals held either behind closed doors or with limited numbers. Churches broadcast their services for their parishioners. In the urban area including the major cities, due to the lack of frequencies, Churches used webcams or Facebook Live to reach their audience while others used the WPAS licensed system but an increasing number of rural parishes began using illegal FM transmitters to broadcast mass every day including funeral Masses and even in some parishes broadcasting bingo and quiz nights. Online digital station Radio Maria based at the Red Cow Roundabout in Dublin saw its audience grew significantly as the faithful listened to services especially daily Mass through the Virgin TV digital platform. The station was also available on DAB and various live radio apps.

Read more here http://ibhof.blogspot.com/2020/07/revealed-worlds-largest-pirate-radio.html

 

In July 2020, the Fine Gael caretaker Government led by Leo Varadkar was replaced with a Coalition Government formed by Fine Gael, Fianna Fail and the Green Party. Following the formation responsibility for broadcasting transferred from the former Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment to the newly created Department of Media Tourism Arts Culture sports and Gaeltacht. A new Government Bill was proposed that would see the replacing of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland with a Media Commission. The Government and the BAI tried to assist the struggling radio sector by announcing a The Government and the BAI tried to assist the struggling radio sector by announcing a €2.5million package to be spread amongst the stations to offset the loss of advertising revenue and the costs associated with remote broadcasting. The previous March, prior to the formation of the Coalition Government, the Minister for Communications announced the waiving of the broadcasting levy paid to the BAI. He said,

‘I recognize the importance of local radio stations to their communities as a trusted source of information on the COVID-19 Pandemic. They play a crucial role, especially in broadcasting community-specific information across the country. In common with other businesses, the local radio sector has experienced financial strain as a result of a drop off in advertising revenue. To ensure that local radio stations can continue to play a role in serving local communities, I have requested the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland to waive the broadcasting levy for the first six months of the year. This action will save local radio stations almost €1m.’

 The timing of Government Press Conferences and Health department updates were timed to suit TV rather than radio. Local radio did however play an important part when localised lockdowns were brought in to curb the spread of the disease.

 

Pirate radio was not immune from activities during the crisis. On July 17th Wild Country who were broadcasting near the border were raided. https://www.facebook.com/106487707585931/videos/1197629210587522/

According to a post Wild County FM put up on their facebook page after a raid by ComReg and the Gardai,

‘Today at approx 11:30am, Officers from ComReg accompanied by Gardai conducted a raid on the Wild Country FM transmission site, which was located at Edentubber, Co. Louth. Equipment valued at €16000 (£14500) was seized and the station was taken off the air at 11:40. While we fully acknowledge that our station was operating without a license, it has filled a valuable void which has been left for local radio, particularly in the South Armagh and Down areas since the departure of Q radio from their Newry Studio. We had been broadcasting the public health advisories on Covid-19 twice an hour for both North and South and if the reaction to our station over the lockdown is anything to go by, we feel we have made this difficult period easier for our listeners by providing Irish and American country music around the clock. Alas this came to an end today, why it took 6 members of ComReg, together with Gardai to do this we will never understand when a simple phone call to us from the authorities would have sufficed. (The CCTV video from our site is like something out of Narcos - sledgehammers etc).’

 

Finally, Hollywood movie star Matt Damon found himself stranded in the south Dublin suburb of Dalkey with some of his family. Locals photographed the superstar which went viral and then two presenters on Spin 1038 began a tongue in cheek campaign to get Damon on air. In May 2020 to both the surprise and delight of presenters Nathan O’Reilly and Graham O’Toole, he rang in from Dalkey and the call made headlines around the world.




 

Wednesday, 22 July 2020

The Irish Half Hour on the BBC 1941 -1943, Wartime Radio Diplomacy




During the so called ‘Emergency’ of World War 2 in Ireland, one of the most popular programmes on the radio saw some of the biggest names in Irish entertainment grace the airwaves but strangely the programme did not emanate from Radio Eireann but from the BBC in London. The BBC and the British information Ministry wanted to produce a programme that would appeal to the many thousands of Irish and Anglo-Irish troops serving on the battlefronts and they also wanted to improve to tense relationship between Britain and Ireland as a result of Ireland’s neutral stance.

Dublin born Jimmy O’Dea had given up his optometry profession to tread the boards of theatres including the Gaiety. In 1928, he had teamed up with writer Harry O’Donovan and they played to packed houses with their successful pantomimes and Summer variety shows. In 1940, O’Dea had starred in a BBC Radio variety show created by Vernon Harris and Eric Spear, titled ‘Melody & Co’ initially recorded at the Bristol studios. When the BBC in London decided on an Irish Show, they contacted Jimmy O’Dea who agreed to initially front the ‘Irish Half Hour’ every second week.

George Marshall who was the regional director of the BBC in Northern Ireland objected to the show’s broadcast on a number of grounds not least the name as it implied that it was including Northern Ireland who was ‘partitioned from Eire’. He also objected to the theme music ‘The Minstrel Boy’ and the fact that some of the introduction was conducted in the Irish language with a simple ‘Cead Mile Failte’. His objections were overruled although when asked later about the show he and the Northern Ireland Regional service referred to it as ‘Eire’s Half Hour’. One of the leading supporters of the show was John Betjeman, the poet and writer later to be knighted, who at the time was an attaché in the British embassy in Dublin.
Betjeman wrote,

‘The Germans at the moment broadcast two progammes a day to Eire, one on a medium wave and a Gaelic programme on Sunday evenings. The BBC would be most effective if broadcast simultaneously with one of the German broadcasts, or Haw Haw, preferably the latter and could thus diminish the Germans’ audience. There is a widespread impression in the country here that of the two BBC programmes, Home Service and Forces, the ‘Forces’ is the one to listen to as it is not the BBC and therefore not propaganda.’



The first show aired at 9.20pm on Tuesday November 11th 1941 and the first featured artist was the great Irish singer Count John McCormack who had been living in London at the time. The first show featured mostly music from McCormack and the BBC Men's Chorus and the BBC Orchestra, conducted by Leslie Woodgate. BBC. The show was compered by future celebrity author Leonard Strong, whose parents were Irish. The Half Hour was produced by Lesley Baily and Ronald Waldman.

The following week November 22nd, it was a different type of show now featuring Jimmy O’Dea as his famous incarnation as Biddy Mulligan, the Pride of the Coombe and sketches and skits featuring the fictional rural Irish town of Ballygobackward. In total up to the final episode on December 3rd 1943 which unusually was pre-recorded to accommodate O’Dea’s panto rehearsal at the Gaiety, eighty episodes were aired. The Radio Times advertised
‘The Irish Half Hour with Jimmy O’Dea and Barbara Mullen specially recorded for Irish men and women in the Forces. Compere, Joe Linnane. Singer, Robert Irwin. Writer, Harry O'Donovan. BBC Revue Orchestra and Chorus conducted by Charles Shadwell. Presented by Pat Hillyard and Francis Worsley

The show was aired on the BBC Forces service although some Irish regional newspapers were referring to it was the BBC Alternative Service avoiding the militaristic term of ‘forces’. The show made no mention of anything contentious in Ireland such as its neutrality or the border between the Irish Free State and Northern Ireland. Not everyone was happy. One letter writer to the Belfast Telegraph who signed himself ‘Ulster Solider’ said that there no mention of Northern Ireland and that,
‘one would think that Dublin was the home to all the Irish servicemen and women, but actual facts show that there are four from Ulster for every one from Eire’.

By its second run that began in May 1942, John McCormack had departed and its was now solely O’Dea’s show. Its growing popularity was demonstrated as it was moved to primetime on a Friday evening and earned itself a midweek repeat for those who may have missed its live transmission. It starred the cream of Irish entertainment and variety who travelled by ship across the dangerous Irish Sea, dodging German U Boats. Others to appear on the bill along with Harry O’Donovan were Joe Linnane who was ‘loaned’ by Radio Eireann to the BBC as Linnane had been hosting the very popular ‘Question Time’ but left early to be replaced by Joe O’Neill. The Irish Times reported the departure but significantly did not mention the name of the BBC show despite it having first aired a year earlier. It wrote,
‘Listeners to Radio Eireann will regret, with me, that our old friend, Joseph Linnane, the   popular Irish Question Time Compere is to leave Ireland shortly to fulfil a contract with the B.B.C.
"Joe." as he is known to thousands of, Irish people, is certainly the best compere we have here, I am inclined to think, indeed, in these islands and the pep which he manages to infuse into his control of a studio full of people each Sunday night is remarkable.
Joe's B.B.C broadcasts will include a series of Irish programmes in which he will be associated with Jimmy O'Dea, Harry O'Donovan. and in which he will have vocal assistance from Robert Irwin and Barbara Mullen, the young Irish stage and film star, who will sing old Irish songs and maybe some new ones as well. The programme will alternate every Saturday with another Irish orgy of melody and mirth, in which Count John McCormack will star. This latter programme will be fathered by L. A. G Strong, who appears to be devoting most of his time these days to broadcasting instead of writing.’



Sean Ryan was a Clare born tenor who appeared from 1942 onwards and it provided a springboard for a tour around Ireland, with his shows being advertised for many years after as ‘coming directly from The Irish Half Hour’. Cyril Cusack, Noel Purcell, Peggy Dell and Cavan O’Connor were also regulars. A variety magazine at the time said that,
‘Cavan O'Connor, well known to listeners for his singing in 'Irish Half-Hour', is every bit as Irish as his name, although he has lived for many years in England. He started to sing at the age of nine, studied under Sir Hugh Allen at the Royal College of Music, since when he has appeared in opera and sung with choral societies and concert parties. He was a popular entertainer on the Western Front during the last war. O'Connor sings not only in English, but in French, German, and Spanish, and many will remember his contributions to the popular 'Cafe Colette' broadcasts.’
Barbara Mullen was another stalwart. Mullen, born in Boston, spent much of her teenage years back with her father on his native Aran Islands where he had starred in the popular film ‘The Man of Aran’. Mullen moved to London to study acting and found herself on the airwaves. She went onto a stellar career on the big screen and on the small screen as the popular Janet McPherson, the housekeeper on BBC Dr. Finlay’s Casebook TV show. Mullen was the star of Eamon Andrews This is Your Life in 1964.

Maye Tipple, who passed away in November 1993, played Biddy’s (O’Dea’s) on air daughter Bridget. She had been O’Dea’s leading lady at the Gaiety and when she departed for London, her role was taken by Maureen Potter who would have a long and successful career on stage and television. Tipple would marry Jack Fennell who worked at Pinewood Studios.

The popularity of the show on both sides of the Irish Sea cannot be underestimated and was a source of concern for Radio Eireann. When it finished in December 1943 a BBC Gallup poll put ‘Irish Half Hour’ as the second most listened to programme on BBC Radio. The show was available on medium wave and more importantly for overseas troops on short wave.

To capitalise on the goodwill created by the BBC’s Irish Half Hour during the war, just after the end of the war a rejuvenated Radio Luxembourg began a request show titled the Irish Half Hour from 1948.

Monday, 20 July 2020

German Wireless off the Galway Coast during WW2


In the last weeks of World War II, the censorship rules were relaxed in Ireland and some of the stories hidden from the Irish public began to appear and they demonstrated the fragility of our neutrality. As details were revealed in the newspapers, the use of wireless as a weapon of battle began to emerge.

As the Battle of the Atlantic raged between the Germans and the Allies, their common enemy was the weather, as both sides battled for supremacy. For both sides, if you had the best metrological reports, your forces had the upper hand. For the Germans, the leading manufacturer of wireless equipment Siemens was tasked with developing ‘wireless’ technologies that could remotely report the weather from the Atlantic. They were highly ambitious and in 1943, the Germans on board a submarine, landed on the coast of Canada’s province of Newfoundland at Martin Bay and established a weather station codenamed KURT, that transmitted coded weather forecast back to the German Navy who used it to identify storms which helped in both identifying merchant convoys and allowing their naval fleet to hide from their British pursuers. According to a Naval warfare historian,
‘KURT was comprised of a telemetry system; 150-watt short-wave antenna; a 10-meter (33-foot) tall antenna mast complete with an anemometer and wind vane on its own separate shorter mast; a 150-watt Lorenz 150FK-type radio transmitter; various meteorological measuring instruments; and ten 100-kilogram (220-pound) steel barrels that contained nickel-cadmium and dry-cell high voltage batteries—each measuring 1 meter (3.3 feet) high by 47 centimetres (1.5 feet) in diameter.’

The WFL-26 station had six-month’s worth of batteries and would collect and record atmospheric conditions—automatically broadcasting the information back to German receiving stations via radio signals. The transmissions were sent for no more than two minutes (one of these precious minutes being allotted for warming up the system) every three hours on a 3940-kHz band, in coded form no less.'



 Siemen's technician Dr. Kurt Sommermeyer aboard U-537 in the Labrador Sea listening to signals transmitted by Weather Station Kurt (named for Sommermeyer) broadcasting from Marin Bay, Newfoundland, 
24th October 1943.

But not only on land did the Germans establish secret weather stations on the continent of North America, Siemens developed sea-based stations. These German ‘robot wireless stations’ were either dropped into the sea from aircraft or launched by submarines and anchored along the Western Irish coast. The Atlantic was an unforgiving sea and the tethers for these ‘robot’ stations often broke loose. One of these was anchored off the coast of Galway near Slyne Head. A fishing trawler from Inishturk snared the device in their nets and hauled it ashore. The Belfast Telegraph reported when the censorship rules were relaxed that,
‘This ingenious apparatus was anchored under the sea and at certain fixed time regulated by an electric clock, pushed up an aerial over the surface and transmitted a report of the prevailing weather conditions in the locality.’
For some of the most technically minded locals in Galway and Mayo, they were able to intercept the signals and while in 1944 and early 1945 the signals from the wireless off the Galway coast was coded, the Germans had dispensed with some of the coding towards the end of the war and local fishermen were taking advantage of the German weather forecasting to assist their fishing, finding themselves forewarned of incoming storm fronts.

The captured German weather station was handed over to the Irish Army who paid the fishermen £ 200 for the salvage of the weapon. It was then transported to Dublin and the Army’s G2 intelligence headquarters. The fishermen all along the West coast not only netted German weather buoys but they also scooped up Allied equipment in their nets. The Allied weather stations were handed over to the Irish authorities who then repatriated them back to Britain who then paid the fishermen salvage recompense. The Examiner reported,
‘During the last two years of the war, a large number of robot weather indicators were either washed ashore on the West Coast of Ireland or caught by fishermen in their nets and brought to ports on the West Coast. The indicators, it was learned yesterday, all bore British Admiralty markings, and were handed over by the Irish authorities to the British Admiralty. Salvage was paid in all cases to the finders. It is believed that the indicators were dropped by planes in the Atlantic and were driven to the Irish coast by winds and currents. They were designed to send out from their delicate mechanism at pre-determined intervals wireless signals regarding the weather in the North Atlantic. So far as can be ascertained, all the indicators were of British origin.’

The importance of the weather off the Irish coast and how it was transmitted especially to the British forces had come to the fore in 1944. According to an article in the Irish Independent,
‘As he cranked the telephone and delivered his news over a crackly line from Co Mayo's most westerly point, Irish Coast Guardsman and lighthouse keeper Ted Sweeney had no idea the lives of more than 150,000 Allied troops would hang on his words.
It was a fateful call. As he watched the barometer fall precipitously, Ted Sweeney's report from the Coast Guard station convinced General Dwight D Eisenhower to delay the D-Day invasion for 24 hours – a decision which averted a military catastrophe and changed the course of the Second World War.
This Friday, June 6, marks the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy – codenamed Operation Overlord. The assault on Hitler's 'Fortress Europe' signalled the beginning of the end of the Nazi regime in Europe with the German surrender less than a year later. Some 5,000 ships and over 11,000 aircraft carried approximately 156,000 Allied troops into battle on D-Day across a 60-mile front.’

The secret wireless station that the Germans based in Newfoundland in 1943 was not discovered until 1977.

Sunday, 12 July 2020

Radio Tralee 1939 - 1990, the legacy of Michael Donovan


Tralee has a long radio history in one guise or another. The first mention of a ‘Radio Tralee’ was in June 1939 when a loudspeaker system was installed in the town for the Tralee Summer Show and Carnival. The ‘station’ studios were installed on Castle Street to entertain those who attended the festival which included a major horse race meeting. According to the 'Kerryman' newspaper on June 17th when reporting the official opening of the Tralee Industrial Fair,
‘Mr. Thomas Lynch, Chairman of the Tralee Urban Council, opened the Tralee Industrial Show and Exhibitions on Wednesday night. Speaking from the studio of "Radio Tralee," he appealed to the people to support the manufacturers who had come to Tralee to show what can be done by Irishmen in their own country.’

The moniker Radio Tralee then reappeared in the sixties and the early seventies, initially during the Rose of Tralee festival when studios were first located in 'Arthurs' music and radio shop on the Square. By 1973, Radio Tralee was on every weekend from the Rose weekend in July until after Christmas providing entertainment and an advertising outlet for the traders in the town. The manager of the shop Declan Moriarty was one of the main presenters on Radio Tralee at the time. In 1974 the station would be moved to Barrack Lane behind the Munster Warehouse and the star presenter was now Sean Hurley.



He would be replaced by a man who would have a lasting impression on the listening public in Tralee, the late Michael Donovan. Donovan would take the name from the towns speaker system and put in on the airwaves properly as Radio Tralee in 1978 when it burst onto the medium wave. Sometimes known as Community Radio Tralee and Downtown Radio Tralee, it closed briefly in December 1979 citing financial problems. In its various guises Donovan would keep a Radio Tralee on the air until December 1988 when new legislation forced the closure of over 100 pirate radio stations across Ireland that ultimately made way for legal independent commercial radio and Radio Kerry. But having been overlooked for a franchise, Radio Tralee came back on the air in late 1989 but was eventually closed by the authorities in July 1990 putting an end to Radio Tralee, or did it?



Thursday, 9 July 2020

Revealed - The World's Largest Pirate Radio Operator, The Irish Catholic Church




The 1988 Wireless Telegraphy Act states:
(1)   A broadcast shall not be made from any premises or vehicle in the State unless it
is made pursuant to and in accordance with a licence issued by the Minister.
 Where a broadcast is made in contravention of subsection (1) of this section,
each of the following shall be guilty of an offence:
(a)    any person who is the owner of, or is in control or is concerned in the
management of, any premises or vehicle from which the broadcast is
made and who knowingly permits or suffers the broadcast to take place,
and
      (2) Where a broadcast is made in contravention of subsection (1) of this section, each of the following shall be guilty of an offence:
 
    (a) any person who is the owner of, or is in control or is concerned in the management of, any premises or vehicle from which the broadcast is made and who knowingly permits or suffers the broadcast to take place, and
      (3) Where in proceedings for an offence under this section it is proved that a broadcast took place from a particular premises or vehicle and that the defendant was, at the time of the alleged offence, the owner of, or in control or concerned in the management of, the premises or vehicle, then, unless there is sufficient other evidence to raise an issue as to whether the defendant knowingly permitted or suffered the broadcast to be made, he shall be treated as having so permitted or suffered the broadcast to be made.
     (4) The provisions of subsection (1) of this section are in addition to those of sections 2  (1) and 3 (1) of the Act of 1968 and nothing in this section shall be construed as amending the said section 2 (1) or 3 (1).
    4.—(1) A person who does any of the acts mentioned in subsection (2) of this section, while satisfying the condition as to knowledge or belief specified in relation to the act, shall be guilty of an offence

It also states
     (2) The acts, and the conditions as to knowledge or belief, referred to in subsection (1) of this section are the following:
(a) making available to another any premises or vehicle or any other thing knowing, or having reasonable cause to believe, that broadcasts are to be made from it in contravention of section 3 (1) of this Act;
( b) having or keeping, or agreeing to have or to keep, apparatus for wireless telegraphy knowing, or having reasonable cause to believe, that by means thereof broadcasts have been, are being or are to be made in contravention of the said section 3 (1);
(c) supplying any apparatus for wireless telegraphy for installation on or in, or installing any such apparatus on or in, any premises or vehicle or any other thing knowing, or having reasonable cause to believe, that, by means of that apparatus, broadcasts are to be made in contravention of the said section 3 
(d) repairing or maintaining any apparatus for wireless telegraphy knowing, or having reasonable cause to believe, that, by means of that apparatus, broadcasts have been, are being or are to be made in contravention of the said Section 3.

Adding,

Publishing dates, times or programme schedules which relate to broadcasts which, if made, would be made in contravention of the   said section3 (1) or (otherwise than by publishing such particulars) publishing an advertisement of matter calculated to promote, directly or indirectly, the interests of a business whose activities consist of or include the operation of a station from which broadcasts are, or are to be, made in contravention of the said section 3.


In December 1988, this new Act, which replaced the lax 1926 Act, forced the plethora of pirate radio stations across Ireland to close and they were subsequently replaced with legal commercial alternatives. But now over thirty years after the ‘great closedown’ another plethora of pirate radio stations fill the Irish airwaves, the length and the breath of the country. They are not the type of radio stations that once populated the airwaves in the 70’s and 80’s but rather a more niche broadcaster, on air a couple of times a week and despite the availability of a legal alternative pathway onto the airwaves, these pirates have decided the break the law and incur the possibility of a €10,000 fine and a possible prison sentence for illegal broadcasting.

When the race for the new independent commercial licences was under way in 1988 and 1989, the Catholic Church made it clear it would not be applying for licences to run religious radio stations under the new local radio legislation. A spokesman at the Catholic Press Office confirmed that the Church was not interested in running any radio station that would broadcast completely religious programming. However, the Church said it would consider becoming involved in community radio. According to the Catholic Press Office, any involvement in radio would be "ecumenical" and would reflect "orthodox community broadcasting lines". 

Yet by 2020 we are in the midst of a pirate radio phenomenon that is being led by the clergy of the Irish Catholic Church. Between January and June 2020, 95 low powered unlicensed pirate radio stations were broadcasting services from churches across Ireland and across the FM frequency dial. In the late 1990’s, churches especially in rural Ireland began to make use of a number of the now defunct pirate radio transmitters and CB radio systems to install stations in their churches to broadcast mass to the predominantly Catholic Ireland. These services were aimed at those who could not make it to the church whether it was through illness, transport issues or if they were resident in care facilities. They would broadcast Mass on a Sunday morning, religious services such as the rosary in the evenings or the Stations of the Cross at Easter but more recently they have been broadcasting bingo sessions, quiz nights and rather than being on air just on a Sunday, they are now operating seven days a week.

Symbolic of the time was the newspaper report in the Mayo News on April 29th 1998 which reported on a parish radio system being set up in Galway,
‘A parish radio system has been installed in the Parish Church in Renmore. It enables the priests to broadcast Mass and all church services to homes who have housebound people. There is a special portable receiver provided to homes at a cost of £3.50 per month which is paid half-yearly at £21.50. Anyone interested should contact the parochial house.’

The amateur pirate broadcasters were however falling foul of the authorities. The Longford Leader reported in November 2002 that Annaduff Parish Radio which was the ‘brainchild of Father Kevin O’Sullivan’ was closed down by the Broadcasting Commission of Ireland as being an unlicensed operation due to a complaint received by them. In the Leitrim Observer a listener observed,
‘seems there was a busybody in our midst who reported the broadcast which was termed illegal under the Act’.
 The service had been broadcasting services from both Annaduff and Drumsna parish churches aimed at the sick and elderly parishioners of the parishes.

In 2006, the spectrum enforcement agency ComReg (Communications Regulator) announced that they had been receiving complaints from Dublin air traffic control that approaching pilots to Dublin Airport were encountering interference with air to ground communications. The pilots reported that they had picked up ‘mass’ on their headsets. According to an article in the Irish Examiner on May 9th 2006,
‘Churches broadcasting Mass on the radio to housebound worshippers have unexpectedly found a new audience, pilots flying transatlantic planes at 30,000ft. Now churches across the country have had to cease their daily FM broadcasts following fears over interference with air traffic control communications. But the ban has come under fire from priests as well as parishioners, who said the religious broadcasts were a lifeline for the housebound. Father Brendan Quinlan used to broadcast Mass on the 106.5FM frequency from the Mother of Divine Grace Church in Finglas, Dublin, to listeners at three nearby nursing homes.’

The issue was immediately raised on the RTE Joe Duffy’s Liveline radio programme, one caller said,
“These broadcasts were greatly appreciated, especially by the housebound. It was a lifeline, they kept in touch with what’s happening but we had no idea it was causing any interference.”

ComReg swiftly enforced the closures contacting a number of churches to explain the need to immediately switch off their transmitters and to comply with the legislation. Many of the church stations at that time broadcast at the higher end of the FM band between 106mhz and 108mhz. Within months after this move by ComReg, that high end of the FM band became populated by transmitters for the almost national roll-out of Newstalk radio in September 2006, which previously had broadcast to Dublin only, since April 2002. The broadcasts of Newstalk were never reported as interfering with air band frequencies. In a Seanad debate in Dail Eireann on May 9th 2006, Independent Senator Joe O’Toole said,
‘Over the past few days, the might and mass of the State has been brought to bear on the housebound who cannot attend mass or services. They are generally aged people who receive a local radio broadcast of mass and religious service from their churches. They are, however, being treated as villains and those providing the service are being criminalised. ComReg has ordered the broadcast services to be stopped as they are interfering with air traffic control. This kind of action gives politics a bad name. Although ComReg has an important function to ensure the airwaves are protected, it must also be recognised that the airwaves are the people's property.’
In the same debate Senator Tom Kitt added,
‘I wish to support the comments made regarding local parish radio masts. I know from personal experience in my parish that they have been of great benefit to the elderly and the housebound. Headlines to the effect that radio masts pose a threat to aircraft and that the regulator would shut down such transmitters are somewhat over the top. It is a grey area and people have been accused of acting illegally by broadcasting mass or even possessing broadcasting equipment. I hope this matter can be clarified and there should be a dedicated radio frequency for parishes to broadcast mass. Although the House could hold a debate in this regard, the quickest solution would be for the regulator to decide on a frequency and allow the resumption of parish masses on radio.’
In the Dail, the then Minister for Communications Noel Dempsey informed the chamber,
‘ComReg has been contacted by the Irish Aviation Authority regarding frequency interference with Air Traffic Control systems and as result of its inquiries, ComReg has contacted three churches in counties Kildare, Meath and Kilkenny in relation to the transmission of religious services. ComReg fully understands the importance of such local community services and intends to permit wireless public address systems to meet the needs of religious and other community organisations.’

Someone is keeping a close eye on the FM aerial at Mountrath

The Catholic Church station in Kinnegad, Co. Meath was one of the station’s identified as causing interference. They had been broadcasting on 107.5mhz and when the station was closed by ComReg the Parish Priest Father Thomas Gilroy said
"I believe from talking to ComReg that some pilots were complaining. I think aeroplanes flying at 30,000 feet were picking up sermons from Kinnegad. Personally, I found ComReg very helpful in all of this. It's no big story, just the usual thing that comes up at national level. It's just a glitch in the system. We were broadcasting on 107.5 or 107.6fm and we were asked to stop. It's a national problem, a fact of the technology. There just don't seem to be enough airwaves."
While ComReg identified Kinnegad Parish radio as just one of a number of transmissions across the country that was interfering with radio frequencies on passing aircraft, the interference demanded the closure of the stations. The Church community radio had been broadcasting every day to the Kinnegad parishioners, including 8.30am mass each morning and the Rosary at 7.30pm.

Other parishes took a far more cavalier approach to the order to close and desist from illegally using the FM band. According to the Donegal News
‘Churches across the Raphoe Diocese regularly broadcast Mass within their local area to allow those who are housebound or ill to hear Sunday Services. Speaking this week in Letterkenny Father Michael McKeever said that despite reports of churches stopping this service for fear of legal action by Comreg, he had received no notification to quit broadcasting.
"As far as I know most parish churches have a radio transmitter on the roof and anyone who can tune into the frequency on their ordinary radio can hear Mass from their local church. It is a service greatly appreciated by those who are housebound or ill. Comreg have a job to do to protect the airwaves and if these broadcasts have to be licensed, we will take it from there,” Fr McKeever said.
He added that it was only last week a parishioner outside the Letterkenny area had said to him how much she appreciated having the Mass broadcast from her own parish church because she had been unable to get out to attend services one Sunday. It allowed her to feel part of her own praying community.
Fr McKeever said that he was aware that churches in Northern Ireland had already been banned from broadcasting Mass from localised transmitters because of the interference with other radio waves.’

St. John’s parish in Kilkenny were very unhappy with having to switch off their illegal transmitter.
‘We were forced to silence our Church Radio system. Because we were engaging in an illegal activity, our bishop, Laurence Forristal, instructed us to stop. We therefore switched off the transmitter after a brief statement to our many listeners before the 10.30am Mass on that morning. It should be noted, however, that it is a verifiable and indisputable fact that St John's radio broadcasts were never and could never be any source of danger to any kind of aircraft, large or small. Our religious services wert broadcast on 96.8 Mhz. Nevertheless, it is true to say that we were unlicensed and therefore illegal. The tragic thing about this new silence is that hundreds of the weak, the vulnerable, the voiceless, the sick, and the lonely are now deprived of daily and weekend worship in communion with our parish church. Reflect for one moment on this if such an action today, in 21st century Ireland, were applied to other faiths, such as to Jews, Muslims, Hindus, etc, what would the reaction be? Would they roll over and say, "let's be grateful for any few crumbs that fall from the master's table" as they were fobbed-off with a ridiculous alternative, like CB Radio?’

The solution was to licence churches to broadcast on the CB channels in the 27mhz frequency band. Once a parish had installed a transmitter and aerial at the church, the parishioners would then purchase a receiver that would allow them to hear the broadcasts. Noel O’Flynn, chairman of the Dail’s Joint Oireachtas Committee on Communications, said
“The move will be a huge relief to thousands of people across the country. They were left without their Church services while ComReg was investigating complaints that certain radio frequencies may have been interfering with aircraft controls.”

This system became known as ‘The Wireless Public Address System’ (WPAS). According to the ComReg website,
Wireless Public Address System
The Wireless Public Address System (WPAS) licensing scheme allows churches and community-based organizations throughout the country to cater for parishioners who are housebound and unable to attend church or other community services.
Application Form : To apply for a license please download the application form - Wireless Public Address System (WPAS) Application Form - 06 / 26a.
Applications should be submitted via email to licensing@comreg.ie .
A fee of € 100 applies to all WPAS license applications.

Churches, including St. Munchin’s in Limerick, said that it would cost almost €5,000[1] to purchased the transmitter and the aerial to put the CB system on the air and then charges of between €40 and €70 would be bourne by the parishioner to purchase a receiver often sold from the Parochial office. Another parish in the Limerick Diocese at Moyvane parish encouraged a fund raising drive to collect € 10,820[2] to pay for the installation of a WPAS radio station in their parish church. That was twice the amount that its fellow parish said it required to open a similar station at the same time.

But within three years of the introduction of the Comreg licensing scheme, newspaper reports were appearing indicating that the local Catholic churches were migrating back to FM. In an Irish Examiner article in November 2009 headlined, ‘Priest launches ‘pirate’ station to broadcast Mass to parishioners’ written by Gordon Deegan, it revealed that Father Brendan Quinlivan of Feakle parish in County Clare had put an illegal FM transmitter on 104.3mhz to broadcast Mass to an 8km radius of the church.

The parish priest said that the radio service is a means of combating rural isolation in the area, remarking that RTÉ doesn’t broadcast Sunday Mass any more on the FM frequency. Local Fianna Fail councillor Pat Hayes said: “It is a great initiative, particularly in the winter time when it is harder for older people to get out.
“Older people feel that they have missed something, that their weekend has not been fulfilled if they are unable to get to Mass. It is very valuable what Fr Quinlivan is doing.”
The article went onto to say to quote the Pirate Priest,
“I don’t have a licence, but the service is for less than one hour each week. It is on a very limited scale and for a very small purpose”.
In response a spokesman for Comreg said that
“any broadcast on the FM frequency without a licence is illegal. Anyone who doesn’t have a licence to broadcast may be causing interference.”
It went back to the original issue in 2006 when it said that unauthorised broadcasting on the FM band can cause interference with the emergency services and air traffic control. As Fr Quinlivan’s broadcast could reach to homes within an 8km radius, it is also reaching 8km into the air, said the Comreg spokesperson.

By 2016, there were numerous stations across Ireland broadcasting Mass in the 27mhz waveband. A DXer and radio listener in Finland picked up many of these stations and both listed them, recorded them and sought verification from the various Catholic churches. Harri Kajula’s 2016 list consisted of 219 different Parish radio stations in the Republic of Ireland. Kujula is located at Naantali in South West Finland and as one priest wrote to him in reply to a reception report, Fr. Shane Crombie from Tullamore Parish wrote "Harri! Congratulations! Such a wonderful and unique project: they say there is a website for everything; now it is true!"



LOCATION                CHURCH                    ADDRESS      LOGGED            FREQUENCY
Adare Parish
Holy Trinity Abbey Ch.
Adare -
Limerick Co.
Oct 2011
 27.621 / LW03
 Aughrim Street Church
 Aughrim Street Parish
 Dublin 7,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2014
  27,612 / LW02
 Arklow Parish
 SS Mary & Peter Church
 Arklow -
 Wicklow Co.
 Oct 2013
  27.631 / LW04
 Askeaton Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Askeaton,
 Limerick Co.
 Dec 2014
  27.332 / CH
 Athea Parish
 St. Bartholomew´s Church
 Athea,
 Limerick Co.
 Feb 2014
  27.025 / CH
 Balally Parish
 Church of the Ascension
 of the Lord
 Dublin 15,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2014
 27.711 / LW12
 Balbriggan Parish
 SS Peter & Paul Church
 Co. Dublin
 Nov 2012
 27.755 / UW16
 Ballindaggin Parish
 St Patrick's Church
 Kiltealy
 Wexford Co
 Oct 2013
 27.675 / UW08
 Ballintemple Parish
 St Michael's Church,
 Potahee
 Ballinagh,
 Cavan Co.
 Dec 2014
  27.601 / LW01
 Ballivor & Kildalkey
 Church of
 St.Columbanus'
 Ballivor,
 Meath Co.
 Feb 2014
  27.665 / UW07
 Ballybrack & Killiney P.
 Church of the Apostles
 Ballybrack,
 Co. Dublin
 Nov 2014
  27.891 / LW30
 Ballybunion Parish
 St John's Church
 Ballybunion,
 Kerry Co.
 Nov 2014
  27.631 / LW04
 Ballyboden Parish
 Church of Our Lady of
 Good Counsel
 Ballyboden
 Dublin Co.
 Feb 2014
  27.771 / LW18
 Ballycullane Parish
 (Gusserane local)
 St John the Baptist
 Church
 Gusserane,
 Wexford Co
 Oct 2013
  27.305 / CH
 Ballydonoghue Parish
 St Teresa´s Church
 Ballydonoghue
 Kerry Co.
Dec 2014
 27.005 / CH
 Ballygall Parish
 Our Mother Of
 Divine Grace
 Ballygall,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
  27.851 / LW26
 Ballyheigue Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Ballyheigue,
 Kerry Co.
 Nov 2011
  27.611 / LW02
 Ballylongford Parish
 Church of St Michael
 the Archangel
 Ballylongford
 Kerry Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.651 / LW06
 Ballyragget Parish
 St Patrick's Church
 Ballyragget,
 Kilkenny Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.631 / LW04
 Ballyroan Parish
 Church of the Holy Spirit
 Marian Road
 Dublin 14
 Oct 2014
  27.811 / LW22
 Beaumont Parish
 Church of the Nativity
 of Our Lord
 Beaumount,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.635 / UW04
 Blarney Parish
 Church of the
 Immaculate Conception
 Blarney,
 Cork Co.
 Dec 2011
 27.831 / LW24
 Bluebell Parish
 Our Lady of the Wayside
 Church
 Dublin 12,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2015
 27.305 / CH
 Boherbue & Kiskeam
 Parish
 Church of the
 Immaculate Conception
 Boherbue.
 Kerry Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.815 / UW22
 Boherbue & Kiskeam
 Parish
 Church of the Sacred Heart
 Kiskeam,
 Kerry Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.205 / CH
 Brackenstown Parish
 St. Cronan´s Church
 Swords,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.891 / LW30
 Bruff - Meanus - Grange
 Parish
 St. Peter & Paul Church
 Bruff,
 Limerick Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.601 / LW01
 Buttevant Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Buttevant,
 Cork Co.
 Mar 2014
 27.601 / LW01
 Cabra West Parish
 Church of the Most
 Precious Blood
 Dublin 7
 Dublin Co
 Oct 2014
  27.891 / LW30
 Caherciveen Parish
 Daniel O´Connell
 Memorial Church
 Caherciveen,
 Kerry Co.
 Feb 2014
  27.601 / LW01
 Caherdavin Parish
 Church of Christ the King
 Caherdavin,
 Limerick Co.
 Feb 2014
  27.731 / LW14
 Caltra Parish
 Our Lady of Lourdes Ch.
 Caltra,
 Galway Co.
 Oct 2013
  27.365 / CH
 Carlingford and
 Omeath Parish
 Church of St. Laurence
 Omeath,
 Louth Co.
 Dec 2014
  27.245 / CH
 Carrickbeg & Windgap
  Parish
 St. Molleran's Church
 Carrick-on-Suir
 Tipperary Co.
 Nov 2014
  27.781 / LW09
 Carrick-on-Suir &
 Faugheen Parish
 St Nicholas Church
 Carrick-on-S.
 Tipperary Co.
 Oct 2013
  27.715 / UW12
 Carrigtwohill Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Carrigtwohill,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2013
  27.811 / LW22
 Castlecomer Parish
 Church of the
 ImmaculateConception
 Castlecomer,
 Kilkenny Co .
 Feb 2014
  27.601 / LW01
 Castledermot Parish
 Church of the
 Assumption
 Castledermot,
 Kildare Co.
 Feb 2014
  27.785 / UW19
 Castletown Parish
 St Patrick's Church
 Gorey,
 Wexford Co.
 Nov 2014
  27.651 / LW06
 Castleisland Parish
 St. Stephen &
 St. John Church
 Castleisland,
 Kerry Co.
 Jan 2014
  27.631 / LW04
 Castlelyons Parish
 St Nichola's Church
 Castlelyons,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2013
  27.345 / CH
 Castletown -
 Geoghedan Parish
 St Michael's Church
 Castletown- G.
 Weastmeath Co
 Nov 2011
  27.665 / UW07
 Charleville Parish
 Holy Cross Church
 Charleville,
 Cork Co.
 Feb 2015
  27.025 / CH
 Churchtown Parish
 St Joseph Church
 Liscarroll,
 Cork Co .
 Oct 2013
  27.805 / UW21
 Clane and Rachcoffey
 Parish
 St. Patrick and St Brigid
 Church
 Clane,
 Kildare Co.
 Nov 2012
 27.651 / LW06
 Clarecastle & Ballyea
 Parish
 SS Peter and Paul
 Church
 Clarecastle,
 Clare Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.795 / UW20
 Clonaslee Parish
 St Manman's Church
 Clonaslee,
 Co Laois
 Nov 2014
 27.681 / LW09
 Clonskeagh Parish
 Church of the
 Miraculous Medal
 Dublin 14,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2015
 27.405 / CH
 Cloyne Parish
 St Colmcille Church
 Churchtown
 South, Cork
 Nov 2011
 27.911 / LW32
 Confey Parish
 St Charles Borromeo
 Church
 Leixlip,
 Kildare Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.841 / LW25
 Corpus Christi Parish
 Corpus Christi Church
 Drumcondra,
 Dublin 9
 Nov 2013
 27.691 / LW10
 Croagh Parish
 St. John the Baptist
 Church
 Croagh,
 Limerick Co.
 Mar 2014
 27.735 / UW14
 Croom Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Croom,
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.175 / CH
 Dolphins Barn Parish
 Church of Our Lady
 of Dolours
 Dolphins Barn
 Dublin 8
 Oct 2013
 27.871 / LW28
 Donaghmede-Clongriffin-
 Balgriffin Parish
 Holy Trinity Church
 Donaghmede
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.711 / LW12
 Donnybrook Parish 
 Church of the Sacred Heart
 Donnybrook,
 Dublin 4
 Nov 2014
 27.761 / LW17
 Dromcollogher –
 Broadford Parish
 Our Lady of the Snows
 Church
 Broadford,
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.365 / CH
 Dromcollogher –
 Broadford Parish
  St. Bartholomew's Church
 Dromcollogher,
 Limerick Co.
 Nov 2015
 27.275 / CH
 Drum Parish
 SS Peter & Paul
 Church
 Athlone,
 Roscommon
 Nov 2012
 27.611 / LW02
 Dunlavin Parish
 Church of St. Nicholas
 of Myra
 Dunlavin,
 Wexford Co.
 Oct 2013
 27185 / CH
 Durrow Parish
 Holy Trinity Church
 Durrow,
 Co. Laois
 Dec 2014
 27.365 / CH
 Ennis Parish
 Ennis Cathedral
 Ennis,
 Clare Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.771 / LW18
 Fedamore Parish
 St John the Baptist Church
 Fedamore,
 Limerick Co.
 Dec 2014
 27.075 / CH
 Fermoy Parish
 St Patrick Church
 Fermoy,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.695 / UW10
 Finglas Parish
 St Canice´s Church
 Finglas,
 Dublin 11
 Oct 2013
 27.405 / CH
 Francis Xavier Parish
 Francis Xavier Church
 Gardiner Str.
 Dublin 1
 Oct 2014
 27.911 / LW40
 Glenmore Parish
 St James Chruch
 Glenmore,
 Kilkenny Co.
 Feb 2014
 27.185 / CH
 Glounthaune Parish
 Sacred Heart Church
 Glounthaune,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.665 / UW07
 Good Sheperd Parish
 Chruch of the
 Good Sheperd
 Dublin 14,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.991 / LW40
 Grenagh Parish
 St. Lachteen Church
 Grenagh,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2014
 27.435 / CH
 Holy Redeemer Parish
 Holy Redeemer Church
 Bray,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.631 / LW04
 Horeswood Parish
 St James Church
 Horeswood,
 Wexford Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.225 / CH
 Howth Parish
 Church of the
 Assumption
 Howth,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2011
 27.745 / UW15
 Inagh and Kilnamona
 Church of the
 Immaculate Conception
 Inagh,
 Co Clare
 Nov 2014
 27.612 / LW02
 Inniscarra Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Berrings,
 Cork Co.
 Feb 2014
 27.605 / UW01
 Kenmare Parish
 Holy Cross Church
 Kenmare,
 Kerry Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.275 / CH
 Kilbarrack - Foxfield
 Parish
 St. John the Evangelist
 Church
 Kilbarrack,
 Dublin 5
 Feb 2014
 27.601 / LW01
 Kilfinane Parish
 St Andrew´s Church
 Kilfinane,
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.151 / CH
 Killann Parish
 St Patrick's Church
 Shercock,
 Cavan Co.
 Dec 2014
 27.981 / LW39
 Killarney Parish
 St. Mary's Cathedral
 Killarney,
 Kerry Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.991 / LW40
 Killavullen, & Annakissa
 Parish
 St. Nicholas´ Church
 Killavullen,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2014
 27,395 / CH
 Kill-o’-the-Grange Parish
 Church of the Holy
 Family
 Dun Laoghaire,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.831 / LW24
 Kilmacud Parish
 Church of St. Laurence
 O’Toole
 Kilmacud,
 Dublin Co.
 Feb 2014
 27.691 / LW10
 Kilmaley Parish
 St John the Baptist
 Church
 Kilmaley,
 Clare Co.
 Feb 2014
 27.185 / CH
 Kilmallock Parish
 SS Peter & Paul Church
 Kilmallock,
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.505 / CH
 Kilmore Road West
 Parish
 St. Luke the Evangelist
 Church
 Kilmore West
 Dublin 5
 Oct 2013
 27.921 / LW33
 Kilrush Parish
 St Senan´s Church
 Kilrush,
 Clare Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.891 / LW30
 Kilsheelan & Kilcash
 Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Gambonsfield,
 Tipperary Co
 Oct 2013
 27.755 / UW16
 Kinsale Parish
 St John the Baptist Church
 Kinsale,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.791 / LW20
 Knockbridge Parish
 St Brigid's Church
 Knockbridge E.
 Cavan Co.
 Nov 2015
 27.225 / CH
 Laragh Parish
 St Brigid's Church
 Laragh,
 Cavan Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.751 / LW16
 Lixnaw Parish
 St Michael's Church
 Lixnaw,
 Kerry Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.891 / LW30
 Mahoonagh Parish
 St John The Baptist
 Church
 Castlemahon,
 Limerick Co.
 Nov 2012
 27.835 / UW24
 Mahoonagh Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Feohanagh,
 Limerick Co.
 Mar 2014
 27.831 / LW24
 Mallow Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Mallow,
 Cork Co.
 Mar 2014
 27.691 / LW10
 Manorhamilton Parish
 S. Clare´s Church
 Manorhamilton,
 Leitrim Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.891 / LW30
 Marino Parish
 St Vincent de Paul
 Church
 Marino,
 Dublin 3
 Oct 2013
 27.035 / CH
 Marley Grange Parish
 Church of the
 Divine Word
 Dublin 16
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.701 / LW11
 Mary Immaculate Parish
 Church of Mary
 Immaculate
 Inchicore,
 Dublin 8
 Nov 2014
 27.819 / LW23
 Mayfield Parish (Upper)
 Our Lady Crowned
 Church
 Mayfield,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.981 / LW39
 Meadowbrook Parish
 St Attracta’s Church
 Ballinteer,
 Dublin 16
 Oct 2014
 27.771 / LW18
 Midleton Parish
 Church of the Most Holy
 Rosary
 Midleton,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.651 / LW06
 Milford Parish
 St Michael´s Church
 Freemount,
 Cork Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.301 / CH
 Milford Parish
 Church of the Assumption
 of the BVM
 Milford,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.631 / LW04
 Mitchelstown Parish
 Church of Our Lady
 Conceived Without Sin
 Mitchelstown,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.375 / CH
 Mountmellick Parish
 St Joseph's Church
 Mountmellick,
 Laois Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.225 / CH
 Mountrath Parish
 St Fintan's Church
 Mountrath,
 Laois Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.601 / LW01
 Mourne Road Parish
 Our Lady of Good Counsel
 Church
 Mourne Road,
 Dublin 12
 Oct 2014
 27.601 / LW01
 Moyvane Parish
 Church of the
 Assumption
 Moyvane,
 Kerry Co.
 Mar 2014
 27.065 / CH
 Mullagh Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Cross,
 Cavan Co.
 Feb 2014
 27. 781 / LW19
 Multyfarnham Parish
 St Nicholas Church
 Multyfarnham,
 Westmeath Co
 Dec 2013
 27.671 / LW08
 Mungret - Crecora -
 Raheen Parish
 St Nessan Church
 Raheen,
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2011
 27.755 / UW16
 New Ross Parish
 St.Mary & St.Michael
 Church
 New Ross,
 Wexford Co.
 Nov 2012
 27.745 / UW15
 Newbridge Parish
 St Conleth´s Church
 Newbridge,
 Kildare Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.951 / LW36
 Newcastle West Parish
  Church of the
 Immaculate Conception
 Newcastle W.
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.605 / UW01
 Newmarket Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Newmarket,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.315 / CH
 Newmarket-on Fergus
 Parish
 Our Lady Of The
 Rosary Church
 Newmarket-
 on F. Clare Co
 Oct 2013
 27.025 / CH
 Newtownshandrum
 Parish
 St Joseph´s Church
 Newtownsh.,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.661 / LW07
 Our Lady Help of
 Christians Church
 Our Lady Help of
 Christians Parish
 Navan Road,
 Dublin 7
 Nov 2014
 27.826 / UW23
 Our Lady of
 Consolation Parish
 Donnycarney Church
 Donnycarney,
 Dublin 5
 Oct 2013
 27.691 / LW10
 Our Lady of the Rosary
 Parish
 Our Lady of the Rosary
 Parish
 Limerick,
 Limerick Co.
 Mar 2014
 27.641 / LW05
 Our Lady Queen Of
 Peace Parish
 Our Lady Queen Of
 Peace Church
 Bray,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.791 / LW20
 Our Lady´s Nativity
 Parish
 Church of Our Lady´s
 Nativity
 Leixlip,
 Kildare Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.655 / UW06
 Parish of the
 Annunciation
 Church Of The
 Annunciation
 Rathfarnham,
 Dublin 14
 Feb 2014
 27.711 / LW12
 Portmarnock Parish
 St  Anne´s Church
 Portmarnock,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.811 / LW22
 Portarlington & Emo
 Parish
 St Michael's Church
 Portarlington,
 Offaly Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.319 / CH
 Rathcormac Parish
 St. Bartholomew's Church
 Bartlemy,
 Cork Co.
 Nov 2011
 27.065 / CH
 Rathcormac Parish
 Church of the
 Immaculate Conception
 Rathcormac,
 Cork Co.
 Dec 2014
 27.515 / CH
 Rathgar Parish
 The Church of Three
 Patrons
 Rathgar,
 Dublin Co.
  Nov 2012
 27.955 / UW36
 Rathkeale Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Rathkeale,
 Limerick Co
 Jan 2014
 27.621 / LW03
 Rathnure Parish
 St Anne's Church
 Rathnure,
 Wexford Co.
 Dec 2011
 27.161 / CH
 Rockhill-Bruree Parish
 Church of the
 Immaculate Conception
 Bruree,
 Limerick  Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.765 / UW17
 Rosslare Parish
 St Brigid's Church
 Rosslare Strand
 Wexford Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.285 / CH
 Sallynoggin Parish
 Our Lady of Victories
 Church
 Sallynoggin,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.871 / LW28
 Sandyford Parish
 St Mary's Church
 (or other parish church)
 Sandyford,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2012
 27.825 / UW23
 Sandymount Parish
 Church of Our Lady
 Star of the Sea
 Sandymount,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.971 / LW38
 Shanagolden & Foynes
 St Senan Church
 Shanagolden,
 Limerick Co.
 Oct 2014
 27.395 / CH
 Skerries Parish
 St Patrick´s Church
 Skerries,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2013
 27.855 / UW26
 Sligo Cathedral Parish
 Cathedral of the Immaculate
 Conception
 Sligo Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.125 / CH
 Springfield Parish
 St Mark's Church
 Tallaght,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.651 / LW06
 Shannon Parish
 SS John & Paul
 Church
 Tullyvarraga,
 Clare Co.
 Oct 2011
 27.621 / LW03
 Sliverue Parish
 Church of the Assumption
 Sliverue,
 Kilkenny Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.205 / CH
 St Agatha's Parish
 St. Agatha's Church
 North Strand
 Dublin Co.
 Dec 2013
 27.691 / LW10
 St Agnes´ Church
 St Agnes´ Church
 Crumlin,
 Dublin 12
 Oct 2013
 27.661 / LW07
 St Anne's and Carraroe P.
 St Anne's Church
 Sligo,
 Sligo Co.
 Nov 2015
 27.395 / CH
 St Bernadette’s Parish
 St Bernadette’s Church
 Clogher,
 Dublin 12
 Jan 2014
 27.751 / LW16
 St Cronan's Parish
 St Cronan's Church
 Roscrea,
 Tipperary Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.621 / LW03
 St Dominic’s Parish
 St Dominic's Church
 Dublin 24
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2014
 27.821 / LW23
 St Gabriel's Parish
 St Gabriel's Church
 Clontarf
 Dublin 3

 27.751 / LW16
 St John's Parish
 St John's Church
 Parnell Str,
 Waterford Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.601 / LW01
 Saint John the Baptist
 Catholic Parish
 St John the Baptist Church
 Clontarf
 Dublin 3

  27.851 / LW26
 St John the Evangelist
 Parish
 St. John the Evangelist
 Church
 Ballinteer,
 Dublin 16
 Oct 2013
 27.641 / LW05
 St. Joseph & St.Benildus  
 and St. Mary’s Parish
 St.Joseph & St. Benildus
 Church
 Waterford City
 Nov 2015
 27.185 / CH
 St Laurence O'Toole
 Parish
 St Patricks Church
 Ringsend,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.671 / LW08
 St Mary's Parish
 St Mary's or Our Lady
 Queen Church
 Athlone,
 Roscommon
 Dec 2011
 27.980a / CH?
 St Mary's Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Lucan,
 Dublin Co.
 Nov 2014
 27.681 / LW09
 St Munchin's & St.
 Lelia's Parish
 St Munchin´s Church
 Clancy Str.
 Limerick
 Oct 2013
 27.601 / LW01
 St Patrick's & St Brigid's
 Parish
 St Brigid's Church
 Singland,
 Limerick Co.
 Feb 2014
 27.615 / UW02
St Peter's Parish Little Bray
 St Peter's Church
 Little Bray,
 Wicklow Co.
 Jan 2015
 27.891 / LW30
 St Peter's Parish Phibsboro
 St Peter's Church
 Phibsboro,
 Dublin 7
 Nov. 2014
 27.731 / LW14
 St Philip the Apostle
 St Philip the Apostle Ch.
 Mountview /
 Clonsilla,
 Dublin 15
 Jan 2015
 27.741 / LW15
 Tarbert Parish
 St Mary's Church
 Tarbert,
 Kerry Co.
 Oct 2013
 27.425 / CH
 Templeglantine Parish
 Most Holy Trinity Church
 Templeglantine
 Limerick Co.
 Jan 2014
 27.741 / LW15
 Tullamore Parish
 Church of the
 Assumption
 Tullamore,
 Offaly Co.
 Feb 2014
 27.631 / LW04
 Walkinstown Parish
 Assumption of the
 Blessed Virgin Mary
 Dublin 12,
 Dublin Co.
 Oct 2014
 27.941 / LW35
 Watergrasshill &
 Glenville Parish
 St Joseph’s Church
 Glenville,
 Cork Co.
 Jan 2014
 27.631 / LW04
 Woodford &   Looscaun
 Parish
 St. Brendan’s Church
 Looscaun,
 Galway Co.
 Feb 2015
 27.075 / CH



















































































































































































































































































































































































(c) http://www.parishradio.harriku.com/

In 2020, the Wicklow parish church informed parishioners on their website,
Channels: You can hear Mass on the following channels and frequencies: Channel UW 04, Frequency 27.63500 and Channel LW 04, Frequency 27.63125. Receiving radios were available to purchase from the Parish office, costing €75.00.

You would imagine that this was an end to the matter but in 2020, Comreg revealed that there were only 61 WPAS licences issued in Ireland and while the majority of them were to Catholic Churches not all of the 61 belonged to religious broadcasts. The Broadcasting Authority of Ireland, the licencing body for Broadcast licences, have since their creation in 1988 as the Independent Radio and Television Commission issued licences to national, regional, local, community, institutional and temporary groupings but no licences have been issued to churches yet as of June 2020 there were more than 100 illegal FM transmitters operating broadcasting services making the Irish Catholic church the largest pirate radio operator in the world.



The requirement for a licence to own a CB receiver in Ireland was abolished in 1998, but this applied to point to point communications not for the use of CB radio for broadcast purposes. According to a communications expert,
‘Yes, some religious and community groups currently transmit on the CB bands and such users would need to change operating channel to one within the WPAS band. Licence-exempt Citizen Band radios may be operated in the frequency band 26.96MHz to 27.41 MHz – just below the WPAS band at 27.6 to 27.99 Mhz. While most equipment can be easily re-tuned, some equipment (transmitter and/or receivers) may not be capable of being adjusted to the WPAS band. In such cases replacement equipment may be required.’

The Broadcasting Authority of Ireland (BAI) who issues licences for the FM band, could issue licences to the Catholic Church under their Institutional Licences category but as of June 2020 the only stations licensed under that title which can be licensed for up to ten years were Dreamtime Radio (Kilkenny), CUHFM Hospital Radio (Cork), Regional Hospital Radio (Limerick), St. Ita’s Hospital Radio (Dublin), South Tipperary General Hospital Radio and Reflink operated by the Irish Rugby Football Union to allow spectators to listen to the match referee.

While Ireland is regarded as a Catholic nation, other denominations including the various Protestant churches (the largest being the Church of Ireland), Jewish and Muslim faiths do not use illegal FM transmitters to reach their congregations. The Catholic church appear to ignore the law and any threat of a €10,000 fine which could approach a fine of almost one million euro if all the transmitter sites were raided, is not a deterrent. The frequencies used are all along the FM band from 88 to 108mhz, despite the fact that a legal alternative has been provided for. In an interview with one County Galway priest, his rationale for using an illegal transmitter on FM was that his elderly parishioners were unable to afford the €40 -€70 cost of a CB receiver and that they all had access to a transistor radio which allowed FM programming. He pointed out to its importance of broadcasting funeral Masses during the pandemic when parishioners were excluded from their parish churches. While there seems to be a need and desire for parish churches to broadcast their services via the radio, despite the fact that many of them now use live video either via Facebook or purposely designed websites, moving these stations from the illegal to legal would be productive in terms of purchasing of licences and enforcement of non-interference and bringing some of these broadcasts under the BAI complaints commission jurisdiction. The ‘blind- eye’ being turned towards these broadcasters is contributed to by the fact that they are not encroaching on the advertising revenue generated by the legal stations across Ireland.



The following list has been compiled from various sources including, Church newsletters, local area news reports and death notices published in regional newspapers, ‘In Memoriam’ website sections of local radio stations including Galway Bay FM and Northern Sound, www.rip.ie and Church Facebook pages. The list has been compiled for the period from 2005 – 2020 and while some of the Churches have abandoned the FM band in favour of online services, the vast majority have continued on FM expressly for their sick and infirm listeners. With Catholic churches closed to the public during the Coronavirus pandemic and mourners banned from funerals, the number of Catholic churches taking to the FM band to broadcast their services has significantly increased. The fact that both Churches and newspaper websites openly advertise these illegal broadcasts is also a cause for concern as it provides a precedent for other illegal broadcasters. Recently during the Coronavirus lockdown, one County Louth Catholic church was broadcasting Mass seven days a week in the mornings, rosary recitals in the afternoons and both Bingo and Quiz night events during the week.



LOCATION                                                  FREQUENCY
St Patrick’s, Skerries                                      87.5 MHz
St Lastra’s, Donaghmoyne, Monaghan          87.5 MHz
Mullagh, Cavan                                              87.6 MHz
Moone, Kildare                                              88 MHz
Drumconrath, Meath                                      89.7 MHz
Carrickmacross, Monaghan                            92.1 MHz
Clonard, Co Wexford                                     92.9 MHz
Castlerea, Roscommon                                   94.5 MHz
Belclare, Clare                                                95 MHz
Fivemilehouse, Roscommon                          95 MHz
Kilbride, Wicklow                                          95 MHz
Urlingford, Kilkenny                                      95.2 MHz
Newmarket on Fergus, Clare                          97.9 MHz
Oldcastle, Cavan                                             98 MHz (previously 108 MHz)
Dungarvin, Waterford                                    98.5 MHz
Monasterevin, Loais                                       99 Mhz
Ardagh, Longford                                           99.7 MHz
Baltinglass, Wicklow                                     100.2 MHz
Ballymacward, Galway                                  101.4 MHz
Immaculate Conception, Glencorrib              101.4 MHz
Shrule, Galway                                               101.4 MHz
Newcastle West, Limerick                             102 MHz
St Patricks, Broomfield, Monaghan               102.4 MHz
Burrishoole, Mayo                                          102.4 MHz
St. Bridget’s Portumna, Galway                     102.8 MHz
Knocknacarra, Galway                                   102.8 MHz
St Enda’s Killanny, Monaghan                      103 MHz
Ferrybank, Waterford                                     103.9 MHz
Lismore, Waterford                                        103.9 MHz
Gort, Galway                                                  104 MHz
Burrishoole, Mayo                                          104.2 MHz
Newport, Mayo                                               104.2 MHz
Ballycorick, Clare                                          104.4 MHz
Ballynacally, Clare                                         104.4 MHz
Mountrath, Laois                                            104.5 MHz
New Ross, Co. Wexford                                 104.7 MHz
Kill, Waterford                                               104.8 MHz
Westport, Mayo                                              104.8 MHz
Ballycommon, Offaly                                     105 MHz
Ennistymon, Clare                                          105 MHz
Quilty, Clare                                                   105 MHz
Robeen Parish, Mayo                                     105 MHz
St Joseph’s, Milltown Malbay, Clare             105 MHz
Woodford, Galway                                         105 MHz
Doon. Limerick                                              105.1 MHz
Moylough, Galway                                         105.1 MHz
Ballyhaunis, Mayo                                         105.2 MHz
Cloughjordan, Tipperary                                105.2 MHz
Newtown, Waterford                                      105.2 MHz
St. Nicholas, Carrick-on-Suir                         105.2 MHz
Castlebar, Mayo                                             105.3 MHz
Lorrha/Dorrha, Tipperary                               105.4 MHz
Tramore, Waterford                                        105.4 MHz
St Senan’s, Shannon, Limerick                      105.6 MHz
Roundfort, Mayo                                            105.75 MHz
Corofin, Galway                                             105.8 MHz
Crooke, Waterford                                         105.8 MHz
Kilmoylan, Galway                                        105.8 MHz [3]
Virginia, Cavan                                              105.8 MHz
Kilteevan, Roscommon Town                        105.9 MHz
Abbeynocmoy, Galway                                  106 MHz
Birr, Co. Offaly                                              106 MHz
Castlemaine, Kerry                                         106 MHz
Milltown, Killarney, Kerry                             106 MHz        
Monivea, Galway                                           106 MHz
St. Coleman’s Claremorris                             106 MHz
St Michael’s Gorey, Wexford                        106 MHz
Wexford Parish                                               106 MHz
Clarinbridge, Galway                                     106.2 MHz
Nenagh, Tipperary                                          106.2 MHz
St Marys, Cahir, Tipperary                             106.2 MHz (Previously 107mhz  to 2011)
Castleconnell, Limerick                                 106.3 MHz
Easkey, Sligo                                                  106.3 MHz
Claregalway, Galway                                     106.4 MHz
Ennis Cathedral, Clare                                   106.4 MHz
Kilconly, Galway                                            106.4 MHz
Killea & Faithleg, Waterford                         106.4 MHz
Thurles, Tipperary                                          106.4 MHz
St Mary’s Ballyhaise, Cavan                          106.4 MHz
Ballintubber, Sligo                                         106.5 MHz
Carrigaline, Cork                                            106.5 MHz
Cloughaneely, Donegal                                  106.5 MHz
Easkey, Sligo                                                  106.5 MHz
Ferbane, Offaly                                               106.5 MHz
Goresbridge, Kilkenny                                   106.5 MHz
Kilasser, Sligo                                                106.5 MHz
Kilbegnet, Roscommon                                  106.5 MHz
Kilbehenney, Limerick                                   106.5 MHz
Kilimor, Mayo                                                106.5 MHz
Kilronan, Sligo                                               106.5 MHz
Kilteely, Limerick                                          106.5 MHz
Lacken, Mayo                                                 106.5 MHz
Naomh Fionán, an Fál Carrach Dun na Gal   106.5 MHz
Portlaoise, Laois                                             106.5 MHz
Rockfield, Coolaney, Sligo                            106.5 MHz
Roskey, Leitrim                                              106.5 MHz
St. Joesph’s Killimor, Galway                        106.5 MHz
St Mary’s Athenry, Galway                            106.5 MHz
St Mary’s Clonmel Tipperary                        106.5 MHz
Toomevara, Tipperary                                    106.5 MHz
Tourmakeady, Mayo                                      106.5 MHz
Williamstown, Mayo                                      106.5 MHz
Barna Furbo, Galway                                     106.6 MHz
Bearna, Galway                                              106.6 MHz
Corrandula, Galway                                        106.6 MHz
Glenamaddy, Mayo                                        106.6 MHz
Glengoole, Tipperary                                     106.6 MHz
Kill, Co. Kildare                                             106.6 MHz
Kilkerrin, Mayo                                              106.6 MHz
Skehana, Galway                                            106.6 MHz
St, Mary’s, Cloghan, Offaly                           106.6 MHz
Ardrahan, Galway                                          106.7 mhz
St Mary’s Killenaule, Tipperary                    106.7 MHz
Lackagh, Athenry, Galway                             106.8 MHz
St. John’s, Kilkenny                                       106.8 MHz
Lackagh, Galway                                            106.9 MHz
St. Andrew’s Bagenalstown                           106.9 MHz
Ballinakill, Mayo                                            107 MHz
Cromane, Co. Kerry                                       107 MHz
Curraroe, Sligo                                               107 MHz
Duagh, Kerry                                                  107 MHz
Gormanstown, Meath